tfttf678 – Apple’s New Photos App

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Chris talks about Apple’s new Photos app and if it’s fit to replace Apterture (hint: not really) of if it’s even a Lightroom replacement (hint: you’ll have to wait). Also: a deep dive into an interesting thread on the photography subreddit.

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Workshops with Chris Marquardt
May 2015: India - Darjeeling First Flush
Oct 2015: San Diego, CA
Oct 2015: New York City
Sep 2015: Ireland - Donegal Dreamscapes
2016: Ethiopia - Danakil Desert
» all workshops

The Date & Time On My Camera Don’t Matter

Okay, let me admit it right at the beginning:

I never set the clock on my camera.

There. I said it.

Daylight Saving Time Defused

Germany has just switched to daylight saving time and like Groundhog Day, there is yet again a flurry of Tweets, blog posts, Facebook posts and YouTube videos reminding you to set the clock in your camera. Twice a year. Again and again. Ad nauseum.

Add some travel into the mix and, unless your camera has a fancy GPS and sets its own time, the repeated clock setting starts to become a real chore.

But you know, to be honest, I’ve had the clock in my cameras set to the wrong time for over a year. Not because I’m lazy (well, okay, there’s a little bit of that) but also because I keep forgetting. I travel to a different time zone, I meet with other photographers, daylight saving time just descends upon me, I’m distracted, I simply forget to change the time and date on my cameras.
Continue reading The Date & Time On My Camera Don’t Matter

Seven Steps To Reclaim Valuable Disk Space By Cleaning Up Lightroom Orphans

Lightroom LogoIf you’ve been using Lightroom for a long time, chances are you have accumulated a lot of orphan files. Those are RAW files that still exist in your pictures folder, but that your Lightroom catalog (the database) doesn’t know about.

During the import of your photos, Lightroom adds a lot of information about the images to its catalog. The file name, all the EXIF data like shutter speed, aperture and ISO, the location of the image file on your hard drive and more.

Orphans accumulate over time because when you try to remove a file from Lightroom, it’s actually quite easy that instead of removing the image file, you remove it from the catalog and not from the hard drive.

Lightroom Delete Dialog

Whenever you press the backspace key while in the All Photographs view, you get the choice to Delete from Disk or Remove. Delete from Disk trashes the image file, while Remove keeps it in its location and just removes it from the catalog. The default is the Remove button, so by simply hitting enter at this point, you’ve created an orphan.

I have now again reached the point where the hard drive that holds my pictures is threatening to fill up, but this time, instead of just buying a bigger drive and adding to the pile of obsolete hardware, I wanted to find out if there were any invisible space hogs on the drive that I could get rid of first. To my surprise, there were gigabytes of orphans strewn all over the place. Most likely those are files that I wanted to Delete from Disk but accidentally just removed from the catalog. It happens.

Here’s how to find and delete these orphans and reclaim all those valuable gigabytes. WARNING: if you follow this method, you will end up permanently deleting photos from your hard drive!

  1. For later reference, check how much space your pictures take up on your disk by selecting the folder where Lightroom saves the images and pressing CMD-I (Info).
  2. Open the folders tab in your Library and select the top level one (in my case it’s called Pictures). This procedure assumes you keep your Lightroom photos under one directory. If your pictures are on several hard drives or under several top-level directories, repeat this process for each of them.
  3. Right click on that folder and select Synchronize Folder… – wait for the following dialog to update its numbers. This can take a while depending on the size of your library. In the end it will show you the number of orphans behind Import new photos.
  4. Select Import new photos and press the Synchronize button. Lightroom will now import those orphans into your catalog. Make sure you select “Add” instead of “Copy” when you import, so the files will stay in their original locations.
  5. Lightroom will automacially select Previous Import in the Catalog panel for you and show you the pictures it found.
  6. IMPORTANT: Review those pictures to make sure you really want to get rid of them.
  7. WARNING: unless you have a backup, this next step will actually remove photos from your hard drive for good. Select all pictures from Previous Import, hit backspace and when prompted, instead of clicking Remove, click Delete from Disk. Lightroom will move them to the Trash. To completely clean things up, empty the Trash.
  8. Check the disk space that’s used by your pictures again.

You have now hopefully reclaimed a ton of hard disk space. How much? If you measured before and after clearing the orphans, let me know in the comments how much space you reclaimed with this method.

About the Author
Chris Marquardt is a photographer and the host of Tips from the Top Floor, a weekly show about all things photography. Chris takes photographers to amazing places, such as Iceland, Mt. Everest Base Camp, India and Ethiopia. He has produced several Lightroom video classes and the popular e-book 1 Hour 1000 Pics - Supercharge your Lightroom Workflow.

tfttf616 – Great Great News

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This episode of TFTTF is full of great news! Chris just finished recording a Lightroom Video Workshop, the new push notification system is online, so from now on you’ll never again miss important TFTTF news and the Marquardt International Pinhole (video) is alive and kicking!

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Workshops with Chris Marquardt
May 2015: India - Darjeeling First Flush
Oct 2015: San Diego, CA
Oct 2015: New York City
Sep 2015: Ireland - Donegal Dreamscapes
2016: Ethiopia - Danakil Desert
» all workshops

tfttf589 – More Light Makes More Dark

image

On this episode of TFTTF German wants to know how to deal with Lightroom and multiple catalogs, Simon has a question on the inverse square law (no math in this episode, promise!) and Happy 111th Birthday, Ansel Adams!

“There is nothing worse than a sharp image of a fuzzy concept” – Ansel Adams

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Shh don't tell Chris this is here

Show Links:

Workshops with Chris Marquardt
May 2015: India - Darjeeling First Flush
Oct 2015: San Diego, CA
Oct 2015: New York City
Sep 2015: Ireland - Donegal Dreamscapes
2016: Ethiopia - Danakil Desert
» all workshops