tfttf646 – Your First Step On The Journey To Become A Better Photographer

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646

Chris wants you to become a better photographer – come with him on a journey to explore photography and learn! The technical side is important, but the non-technical side is even more important – that’s where many photographers today want to improve. From now on, in every episode, Chris will pick a new video for you to watch to help expand your horizon – and don’t forget to discuss it in the comments below or on the TFTTF community at tfttf.com/community

Show Links:

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Workshops with Chris Marquardt
Feb 1-7 2015: Aurora Borealis, Iceland
May 2014: Mt. Everest
May 2015: Darjeeling First Flush
all workshops

tfttf645 – Oh So Many Questions

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645

Here comes the long awaited Q&A show! Allistair asks about filters, Gavin wonders about the focus on his lens, Joanne shot the picture of her lifetime and needs marketing advice, Satchin has a question about depth of field in full-frame and crop cameras and John is a fan of Michael Kenna’s photography and wants to learn about long exposures.

Show Links:

» Download the MP3 for this episode

Workshops with Chris Marquardt
Feb 1-7 2015: Aurora Borealis, Iceland
May 2014: Mt. Everest
May 2015: Darjeeling First Flush
all workshops

tfttf644 – Toys, The Key To Photographic Success

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Did hell just freeze over? Chris is talking about how gear and toys can help make you a better photographer. That’s unheard of.. unless you’re listening to this episode of Tips from the Top Floor!

Show Links:

» Download the MP3 for this episode

Workshops with Chris Marquardt
Feb 1-7 2015: Aurora Borealis, Iceland
May 2014: Mt. Everest
May 2015: Darjeeling First Flush
all workshops

tfttf643 – Here’s An Idea On A Golden Plate

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Chris discusses the death of Aperture and what that means for photographers (hint: the future is not too bleak). He will also talk about shooting in the Dublin Docks with an iPhone and about the idea that was born from that. If you are a photographer, “Straight Cam” might literally change your perspective. If you are an iOS developer, make sure you don’t miss this unique idea for an app, and it even includes marketing!

Quote of the day:
“Photography for me is not looking, it’s feeling. If you can’t feel what you’re looking at, then you’re never going to get others to feel anything when they look at your pictures.” – Don McCullin

Show Links:

» Download the MP3 for this episode

Workshops with Chris Marquardt
Feb 1-7 2015: Aurora Borealis, Iceland
May 2014: Mt. Everest
May 2015: Darjeeling First Flush
all workshops

Seven Steps To Reclaim Valuable Disk Space By Cleaning Up Lightroom Orphans

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Lightroom LogoIf you’ve been using Lightroom for a long time, chances are you have accumulated a lot of orphan files. Those are RAW files that still exist in your pictures folder, but that your Lightroom catalog (the database) doesn’t know about.

During the import of your photos, Lightroom adds a lot of information about the images to its catalog. The file name, all the EXIF data like shutter speed, aperture and ISO, the location of the image file on your hard drive and more.

Orphans accumulate over time because when you try to remove a file from Lightroom, it’s actually quite easy that instead of removing the image file, you remove it from the catalog and not from the hard drive.

Lightroom Delete Dialog

Whenever you press the backspace key while in the All Photographs view, you get the choice to Delete from Disk or Remove. Delete from Disk trashes the image file, while Remove keeps it in its location and just removes it from the catalog. The default is the Remove button, so by simply hitting enter at this point, you’ve created an orphan.

I have now again reached the point where the hard drive that holds my pictures is threatening to fill up, but this time, instead of just buying a bigger drive and adding to the pile of obsolete hardware, I wanted to find out if there were any invisible space hogs on the drive that I could get rid of first. To my surprise, there were gigabytes of orphans strewn all over the place. Most likely those are files that I wanted to Delete from Disk but accidentally just removed from the catalog. It happens.

Here’s how to find and delete these orphans and reclaim all those valuable gigabytes. WARNING: if you follow this method, you will end up permanently deleting photos from your hard drive!

  1. For later reference, check how much space your pictures take up on your disk by selecting the folder where Lightroom saves the images and pressing CMD-I (Info).
  2. Open the folders tab in your Library and select the top level one (in my case it’s called Pictures). This procedure assumes you keep your Lightroom photos under one directory. If your pictures are on several hard drives or under several top-level directories, repeat this process for each of them.
  3. Right click on that folder and select Synchronize Folder… – wait for the following dialog to update its numbers. This can take a while depending on the size of your library. In the end it will show you the number of orphans behind Import new photos.
  4. Select Import new photos and press the Synchronize button. Lightroom will now import those orphans into your catalog. Make sure you select “Add” instead of “Copy” when you import, so the files will stay in their original locations.
  5. Lightroom will automacially select Previous Import in the Catalog panel for you and show you the pictures it found.
  6. IMPORTANT: Review those pictures to make sure you really want to get rid of them.
  7. WARNING: unless you have a backup, this next step will actually remove photos from your hard drive for good. Select all pictures from Previous Import, hit backspace and when prompted, instead of clicking Remove, click Delete from Disk. Lightroom will move them to the Trash. To completely clean things up, empty the Trash.
  8. Check the disk space that’s used by your pictures again.

You have now hopefully reclaimed a ton of hard disk space. How much? If you measured before and after clearing the orphans, let me know in the comments how much space you reclaimed with this method.

About the Author
Chris Marquardt is a photographer and the host of Tips from the Top Floor, a weekly show about all things photography. Chris takes photographers to amazing places, such as Iceland, Mt. Everest Base Camp, India and Ethiopia. He has produced several Lightroom video classes and the popular e-book 1 Hour 1000 Pics - Supercharge your Lightroom Workflow.