Become a Patron

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Become a patron, get rewards!

Become a Patron

I just added a new way to support the show: Patreon. Think crowd-funding for artists. Become a patron starting as low as $1. Did I mention rewards? ;) Yes, rewards will be based on the size of your patronage. And this is just the beginning. I’m planning for more rewards over time.

Of course TFTTF is free and will stay free. I’m very humbled by your awesome contributions, but they are not mandatory to be a listener of TFTTF.

» More ways to support the show – thanks for being a supporter!

Chris Got Very Wet. And Cold. #icebucketchallenge

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The Ice Bucket Challenge is taking the world in storm. And to those who say “enough already”, I respond: if you don’t want to see it, ignore it.

Here’s what this is about: Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, also known as ALS. It’s a devastating disease of the nervous system and simply said: it kills in a slow and horrible way. Patients slowly lose control over their muscles. ALL their muscles. One of the more famous people with ALS is Stephen Hawking.

ALS is not fun. ALS is dead serious. And the ice bucket challenge isn’t making light of it. The challenge is a wonderful way to raise awareness, and it’s necessary because most people don’t even know what ALS is. It’s is a rare disease of the nervous system (approx. 30,000 US Americans have it) and as a result of that, the pharmaceutical industry has no incentive of making any serious investments into finding a cure.

Which is why everybody should chip in for ALS and all the other rare neurological diseases. A good place to do so is the ALS Assocication at www.alsa.org.

Back to the ice bucket and how I got involved: Jon Miller took the Ice Bucket Challenge and then challenged me.

After I did my part (and obviously donated too), I challenged Sean Galbraith (see his video here), Ingo Quendler (here is his video) and Sebastian “Schlingel” Wölfle (watch him get wet here).

You should seriously look up the translation for the German word “Schadenfreude” :)

Workshops: Fotomonat September wird spannend [German]

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This one’s for the German listeners (or for those who live nearby and want to improve on their German).

September ist Fotomonat mit drei spannenden Workshops:

Es ist noch eine begrenzte Anzahl Plätze frei.

Hier geht es zum offiziellen Newsletter mit weiteren Informationen.

Foto: Thomas Hiermayer

Seven Steps To Reclaim Valuable Disk Space By Cleaning Up Lightroom Orphans

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Lightroom LogoIf you’ve been using Lightroom for a long time, chances are you have accumulated a lot of orphan files. Those are RAW files that still exist in your pictures folder, but that your Lightroom catalog (the database) doesn’t know about.

During the import of your photos, Lightroom adds a lot of information about the images to its catalog. The file name, all the EXIF data like shutter speed, aperture and ISO, the location of the image file on your hard drive and more.

Orphans accumulate over time because when you try to remove a file from Lightroom, it’s actually quite easy that instead of removing the image file, you remove it from the catalog and not from the hard drive.

Lightroom Delete Dialog

Whenever you press the backspace key while in the All Photographs view, you get the choice to Delete from Disk or Remove. Delete from Disk trashes the image file, while Remove keeps it in its location and just removes it from the catalog. The default is the Remove button, so by simply hitting enter at this point, you’ve created an orphan.

I have now again reached the point where the hard drive that holds my pictures is threatening to fill up, but this time, instead of just buying a bigger drive and adding to the pile of obsolete hardware, I wanted to find out if there were any invisible space hogs on the drive that I could get rid of first. To my surprise, there were gigabytes of orphans strewn all over the place. Most likely those are files that I wanted to Delete from Disk but accidentally just removed from the catalog. It happens.

Here’s how to find and delete these orphans and reclaim all those valuable gigabytes. WARNING: if you follow this method, you will end up permanently deleting photos from your hard drive!

  1. For later reference, check how much space your pictures take up on your disk by selecting the folder where Lightroom saves the images and pressing CMD-I (Info).
  2. Open the folders tab in your Library and select the top level one (in my case it’s called Pictures). This procedure assumes you keep your Lightroom photos under one directory. If your pictures are on several hard drives or under several top-level directories, repeat this process for each of them.
  3. Right click on that folder and select Synchronize Folder… – wait for the following dialog to update its numbers. This can take a while depending on the size of your library. In the end it will show you the number of orphans behind Import new photos.
  4. Select Import new photos and press the Synchronize button. Lightroom will now import those orphans into your catalog. Make sure you select “Add” instead of “Copy” when you import, so the files will stay in their original locations.
  5. Lightroom will automacially select Previous Import in the Catalog panel for you and show you the pictures it found.
  6. IMPORTANT: Review those pictures to make sure you really want to get rid of them.
  7. WARNING: unless you have a backup, this next step will actually remove photos from your hard drive for good. Select all pictures from Previous Import, hit backspace and when prompted, instead of clicking Remove, click Delete from Disk. Lightroom will move them to the Trash. To completely clean things up, empty the Trash.
  8. Check the disk space that’s used by your pictures again.

You have now hopefully reclaimed a ton of hard disk space. How much? If you measured before and after clearing the orphans, let me know in the comments how much space you reclaimed with this method.

About the Author
Chris Marquardt is a photographer and the host of Tips from the Top Floor, a weekly show about all things photography. Chris takes photographers to amazing places, such as Iceland, Mt. Everest Base Camp, India and Ethiopia. He has produced several Lightroom video classes and the popular e-book 1 Hour 1000 Pics - Supercharge your Lightroom Workflow.

Aperture development stopped by Apple. What now?

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Aperture goneApple just announced that they will stop development on Aperture and instead concentrate their efforts on the new Photos app, which will also replace iPhoto. On the one hand it makes sense to consolidate efforts, on the other hand losing Aperture makes me sad.

I have been a Lightroom user from day one, actually from the first beta. I know Lightroom in and out and whenever I used Aperture it felt a bit foreign. My connection with Lightroom goes so far that I have released several video workshops to make it easy for beginners to get up to speed with Lightroom.

But still, monopolies are bad and competition is good for product quality. Competition is what keeps both, Apple and Adobe on their toes. So I really hope the new Photos app that Apple announced on the 2014 WWDC keynote will be a worthy successor to Aperture that has the potential to keep Lightroom in check.

Still, Aperture will not disappear from your computer right away. It won’t evolve any further, but according to TechCrunch “Apple says that it will provide compatibility updates to Aperture that allow it to run on OS X Yosemite”. And Adobe announced that they will provide a migration path for users who want to switch.

In the meantime, if you are an Aperture user who is now searching for a new home, let me point you to two products that I made and that I’m very proud of:

  • Discover Lightroom – a Lightroom video workshop that takes you from the first steps to proficiency. Over six hours of DRM-free 720p HD video.
    DRM-free H.264 (watch free sample videos)
  • 1 Hour 1000 Pics – Supercharge your Lightroom Workflow – how much is your time worth? This highly rated ebook (and free audiobook!) explore and explain why a solid workflow is key and then provides you to the point with a fail-safe method that allows you to quickly boil down that pile of images to the essence, to your very best photos

Both sites give you a ton of free demo content to help you decide.