tfttf485 – Toronto Urban Photography

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Toronto Business District

It’s the end of the second day of the 2010 Toronto Urban Photography Workshop, the group is having a blast (and a slice of pizza) and we’re about to leave to the roof of the building to take some spectacular night skyline pictures.

Chris is joined live on this episode by Toronto photographer Sean Galbraith, Monika Andrae of Monis Motivklingel and Ravsitar the Release Pixie himself!

On this 75-minute episode (yes, here comes that extra round of walking the dog!) we talk about virtually everything, including some Photokina 2010 news, what to watch out for when buying used photo equipment, and we’ll answer a ton of questions from the audience.

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  • http://torontophotowalks.ca/ Paul Henman

    Days 1 &2 were great – looking forward to day 3!

  • http://madmarvonline.com Mad Marv

    I use Hugin for stitching panoramas and it works great. It is free, open-source software that runs on Windows, OSX and Linux. I dump in jpg, tif and/or RAW files (assuming you have the codec for your particular camera) and it will align and stitch the pano automatically.

    http://hugin.sourceforge.net/download/

    Here’s some panoramas that I made w/ Hugin.

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/madmarv/4931086177/

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/madmarv/4392889281/

  • Steve

    I agree on Hugin, and it can do HDR too.

  • Toby Hetherington

    Microsoft Photosyth is worth a checkout for Panamic style pictures, this allow you to create a 3ish panaramic image which one can scroll around. It limited in that the picture is stuck to the microsoft website however is interesting to experiment with.

  • Mike Whitman

    I use Calico for panorama stitching on the Mac. It’s $39 from http://www.kekus.com.